Texas Wesleyan University President Frederick G. Slabach gave a “state of the university” speech Tuesday in Martin Hall, discussing the university’s progress in campus life, fundraising and enrollment.

The university is working toward the 2020 Vision and increasing awareness of Wesleyan in Fort Worth, Slabach said.

“As we approach the 125th anniversary of Texas Wesleyan University,” said Slabach, “we can be confident that the state of our university is sound, and that our basic educational model is strong.”

Slabach also said that:

  •  There is a high energy in student life and 450 students are now living on campus.
  • Academic quality has been improving and will continue to grow as he honors the wishes of Dr. Bobby Deaton who passed away Jan. 13, 2015.
  •  Last year Wesleyan achieved its highest ever media recognition.
  •  There is an increased effectiveness of fundraising. Wesleyan hired a new vice president of advancement, Jim Lewis, in November 2014. Lewis is working to reorganize the advancement function and has been talking to major resources to help Wesleyan receive grants for the Rosedale Renaissance project and future developments.
  •  A new Texas Wesleyan history book is going to be published this summer for the 125th anniversary of the university that is taking place during the 2015-2016 school year.
  • The campus is introducing a $6.2 million self-funding energy saving project that will help the university save on energy costs.
  • The Rosedale Renaissance project is expected to be complete by June, including the construction on Rosedale Street. He wants to continue to improve the area by implementing an economic revitalization to surrounding neighborhoods.
  •  The school is doing well financially, having received the highest audits and ratings. Strong student enrollment is one of the key factors to keeping financial success. Wesleyan has raised freshmen domestic enrollment 19 percent, as well as an increasing both domestic transfer and international student enrollment. The increase in enrollment is credited to the Smaller. Smarter. marketing campaign, improved campus aesthetics, and increased student experiences.
  •  More than 50 private colleges have closed nationally, including 2 in Texas. Forty-five percent of private universities are seeing enrollment declines and increasing debt. Texas Wesleyan has been able to reduce its debt.
  •  There are plans for community college technical degrees to become transferable so students can earn a bachelor’s degree. He also wants to explore online classes to help working adults and follow recent college trends.

“We provide what the mass majority of college-bound high school students want- individualized attention by talented faculty, intentionally small classes,” said Slabach. “Our Smaller. Smarter. brand is not just a marketing slogan, it encapsulates our entire educational philosophy.”