Pumpkin patches, hay rides, carving jack-o-lanterns, corn mazes, campfires and spice cakes are just a few things to enjoy in the fall season. These type of activities are some of my favorite memories growing up and fall has always been my favorite time of year.

But unfortunately, thanks to our society, it is one of the shortest.

On Saturday morning I went to a Starbucks to do homework.  Instead of pumpkin spice lattes and pumpkin bread treats, I walked in the store to find red menus containing all of the winter flavors.  In addition to the new flavors, the counter tops displayed advent calendar and winter themed mugs.

Starbucks isn’t the only business that transforms for a new season on November 1st.  Almost all fall themed décor is moved to the clearance racks and their front and center displays are replaced with Christmas decorations, gifts and food.

When did Halloween replace Thanksgiving as the primary fall holiday?

In addition to Christmas merchandise, we are also flooded with Black Friday Sales in the beginning of November.  What does this say about America?

 

We need to live in the moment.

In January, we want nothing more than spring weather.  In July, we want nothing more than cool fall weather.  No matter what time of year it is, we are always hoping it is another.  Life goes by fast and the seasons fly by on their own, so why should we rush it?

 

We need to be Thankful.

Thanksgiving is a time to spend with family and be thankful.  But instead, we are consumed with consumerism.  Instead of us thinking about what we are thankful for, we are camping out at stores to fight crowds for bargains.

We need to remember history.

This one can be applied to many holidays.  On the 4th of July do you really think about the Declaration of Independence and the birth of the United States of America as an independent nation in the midst of your day on the lake with friends?  

We have begun to celebrate holidays in a way that is simply following tradition and the culture, not remembering and recognizing the origination of that celebration.  

Many countries have a day of giving thanks and celebrating the harvest of that year, but here in the United States we celebrate it on the fourth Thursday of November. The history of Thanksgiving in North America goes back to the 1621 celebration at Plymouth, present-day Massachusetts. This feast was a result of a good harvest and giving thanks for their good fortune beginning their new life in America.  

 

We need to keep carving pumpkins.

Christmas celebration can wait until November 27th.  Enjoy fall activities and events because they will be gone before you know it.  Most importantly, remember to be thankful during this holiday season and not be consumed with all our culture distracts us with.  Spend time with your family and friends, because in the end that matters far more than any bargain on Black Friday.

I begin to transition into Christmas celebrations starting on December 1st. The beginning of December is the perfect time to put up decorations, allowing plenty of time for my hard work to be displayed. But ideally, I wait until mid-December to begin listening to Christmas music, otherwise I will be completely tired of the repetitive music when Christmas Day comes.

I promise I’m not a scrooge, and I actually do love the Christmas season. Just let me finish enjoying my pumpkin pie.

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Jessica Liptak

Jessica Liptak

Jessica Liptak is a senior, mass communication major and is graduating in December. She is the Digital Media Editor and has been part of the Rambler since September 2013. She is also a member of the women’s golf team at Texas Wesleyan and enjoys doing art in her free time.
Her awards include:
· 1st Place- Newspaper, Sports Feature Story (Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, 2015)
· 2nd place- Online, Division 2, Best Audio Slideshow (Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, 2015)
· 3rd place – Online, Division 2, Multimedia Package (Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, 2015)

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