Should marijuana be legal in Texas?

It has been a blazing topic lighting up controversy and sparking up a debate, so to speak.

Many people believe that it should be. Twenty-three states have legalized marijuana in at least medicinal form, but Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Alaska are the only states to have legalized pot for both medicinal and recreational use.

So why hasn’t Texas done more than the Texas Compassionate Use Act? Texas is one of the few states that has a booming economy. One of the main reasons people come to Texas because of economic growth, and if marijuana was legalized, the possibilities of economic growth would essentially be endless.

 Colorado legalized marijuana back in 2014 and in 2015 the state made close to $1 billion in sales, according to information published on cannabist.com. The state collected more than $135 million in taxes and fees, and dedicated more than $35 million of that to school construction projects.

Let’s forget about Texas for a minute. Let’s look at the federal government.  If weed was legalized in all 50 states at least for medicinal purposes, imagine the boost to our economy. For a country that is trillions of dollars in debt, that would help tremendously.

Marijuana is proven to be medically beneficial. Cannabis, which is also known as marijuana, has been scientifically proven to help those suffering from seizures and to help with glaucoma. It can also be used to treat different types of muscle pain and spasms.

So why ban something that could potentially be useful to us? If a state as small as Colorado can bring in close to a billion dollars in sales, what could a state like Texas bring in if it was legalized for more than just for treatment of epilepsy? Texas is practically double the size of Colorado.

According to an article published in the International Business Times, there were more than 700,000 marijuana-related arrests in the United States in 2014, which amounts to one every 45 seconds. The government in recent years has tried to crack down on the war on drugs by pumping money into trying to stop it, but clearly that hasn’t worked.

If we were to fully legalize marijuana, the crime rate automatically goes down and we can focus our efforts on other issues.

Federal and state governments that constantly complain about having no money and no ways to generate money should stop whining, open their eyes and look at Colorado as a shining example for what a booming economy can look like thanks to the legalization of marijuana.

Texas should be among those states.