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As The Rambler embarks on its 100-year anniversary, we, its current staff, would like to celebrate what exactly it means to be the voice of Texas Wesleyan. And since fitting 100 candles onto a cake can prove difficult, we decided to celebrate in the best way we know how – through journalism.

This week, we will be posting daily online content to commemorate this special occasion.

Before it was renamed The Rambler in 1935, to coincide with the transition of Texas Woman’s College to Texas Wesleyan College, The Rambler was called The Handout, according to “The History of the Rambler,” an article by Michael Sewell published in Wesleyan’s A Centennial Album.

Born January 1, 1917, The Handout was just the beginning of a publication that has covered both major national events, such as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, and important campus news, such as when Wesleyan graduated from a college to a university in 1988.

The Rambler not only has covered Wesleyan traditions, it created one of its own. In 1938, we founded The Guardians of the Golden Shears, a student-led and student-nominated organization that celebrates students who excel in academics, possess leadership skills and are active on campus.

It makes sense that The Rambler would begin an organization that celebrates students, because, really, students are who we’re all about. The Rambler not only provides its entirely student staff with a place to gain real-world work experience, but it also gives the more than 2,000 students who walk the halls of this campus a voice.

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Times weren’t here asking Wesleyan students how they felt on September 11, 2001, or how they felt last week when Donald Trump won the election, but The Rambler was.

Wesleyan may be small, but we have a voice – and it’s The Rambler.

Take a look at where it all began: