Blade Runner 2049 is a sequel made more than thirty years after Ridley Scott’s original 1982 film.

Creating this sequel is a daunting task considering the immense time gap. Usually films made so many years after the original are reboots of the original or perhaps even made as an independent story.

2049 is an epic depiction of life after the human race. It is in all ways a masterpiece. There have been controversies about the film; moviegoers and critics have said the original was so much better for various reasons.

But in my opinion, 2049 is in all ways a solid science fiction feature with substantial thought-provoking ideas throughout. It challenged me intellectually and emotionally.

2049 is set in Los Angeles like the 1982 film; there are few Nexus 6 rogues (the older models) still lingering around are hunted throughout the film. Ryan Gosling (K) is a Los Angeles cop that tracks down and exterminates the older replicants.

He discovers evidence that a replicant may have done something that is supposed to be impossible for replicants and the species, and he becomes obsessed with the conspiracy he has discovered and devotes the rest of the film to uncovering this hidden truth.

The graphics were breathtaking and the futuristic effects were simply outstanding. Director Denis Villeneuve made the clever move of shifting to a retro-futuristic vibe.

The acting was superb as well. Gosling delivers a stellar performance, as does Harrison Ford as Rick Deckard. The eerie, blind CEO, Niander Wallace, played by Jared Leto, was phenomenal. Wallace is responsible for building the new, improved and obedient replicants, and Leto gives a great performance in his short time on camera.

Robin Wright, playing a Los Angeles police chief, delivered an unbelievable performance as well, bringing breathtaking seriousness to her role. She played a substantial role in the film and gave a very humanistic perspective to the piece.

I appreciated the straight forwardness of the film, but yet still found myself questioning so many different ideas throughout. I found myself wondering who was a human, who was a replicant, and what is the purpose of different characters.

Essentially this film was a combination of old and new. Villeneuve did a superb job of bringing the first film into the new one. It is only fitting that there are such different views from film goers. In all ways the positives outweigh any negatives. Blade Runner 2049 is an instant classic and is in all ways equal to its predecessor.

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Peyton Prudhomme

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