After a decade of inactivity, a sorority is working to revive its Texas Wesleyan chapter.

“We would like to thank the Texas Wesleyan community for letting us be involved in bringing the chapter back to campus,” Kali Rogers-Smith said. “We’re excited to be back, and hopefully by the end of this year we will definitely have more young women representing royal blue and white. We’re very hopeful for that and very determined to help bring Zeta Phi Beta back.”

Rogers-Smith is the advisor for Zeta Phi Beta for Texas Wesleyan and active in the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Incorporated and the Eta Tau Chapter. She said she has been working to start the Zeta Phi Beta chapter at Wesleyan and hopes to recruit at least five students this semester to get the sorority active.

Kali Rogers-Smith talks during a Zeta Phi Beta Information Meeting on Wednesday night in the Carter Conference Center. Photo by Hannah Onder

“It’s been a very educational journey for me getting to know the students, but it’s also been fun,” Rogers-Smith said. “I have no regrets with helping to spearhead this and getting to know the students of the campus, the faculty and staff and how they’ve been essential to this university. They have been very inquisitive of Zeta Phi Beta and what we represent.”

She said Zeta Phi Beta is a sorority that was established in in 1920 at Howard University on the principles of scholarship, service, sisterhood, and finer womanhood and has grown to have more than 600 chapters worldwide with more than 100,000 members. Zeta’s also connected to its brother organization, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, which was founded at Howard in 1914.

“We mostly represent improving communities, especially communities that are struggling,” Rogers-Smith said. “That’s basically been our MO. We’re very service oriented and we do have many programs in which we try to tailor to assisting the needs of communities everywhere.”

Even though Zeta Phi Beta is historically black, Rogers-Smith said the sorority is open to women of all backgrounds that share their founding values of scholarship, service, sisterhood, and finer womanhood and are interested in expanding the Greek Life on campus.

“We’re definitely looking for women that want to be involved, that want to expand upon their leadership roles on campus, be involved in community while also representing organizations within the National Pan-Hellenic Council, which is a collective of black Greek letter organizations and represent Zeta Phi Beta to the fullest extent,” Rogers-smith said.

The minimum requirements for Zeta Phi Beta are a GPA of at least 2.5, at least 12 credit hours, financial capability, and documentation, such as a resume showing leadership and involvement on campus. To join or for more information students should contact Zeta Phi Beta’s third vice president of their graduate chapter in Fort Worth at psizeta3rd@gmail.com.

Zeta Phi Beta isn’t the only sorority working on recruitment on campus. Lambda Tau Zeta hosted a recruitment event Tuesday night called Dreaming for a Lupus Cure with their new President Alison Baron, a junior theater major.

“It (the position of president) wasn’t something I expected to be given, but I’ve taken it,” Baron said. “A lot of the girls are excited just to get things done, get stuff started, and I wanted to push us to do more, not just have fun, play games, but to do more for the community and do more for the school.”

Video by Miranda Day

Alpha Xi Delta also hosted an event to kick off their spring recruitment on Tuesday evening called S’more fun with Alpha Xi.

“As far as recruitment goes we don’t really have a certain type of person we look out for,” said Marissa Quintanilla, Alpha Xi Delta president. “It’s just whoever we think is really sisterly. We encourage anyone to come out to our recruitment.”

Video by LaTerra Wair

Alpha Xi Delta begins their formal recruitment on Feb. 5 and then starts their informal recruitment Feb. 13.
Graphic by Hannah Onder