Texas Wesleyan’s admission and registration process sends students in circles.

Taking a new step in life can be a stressful process, but today’s resources should make the process easier.  Students are able to apply online. They fill out their paperwork, transfer their documents to administration, apply for financial aid and set up an appointment with an advisor.  It all sounds simple – until they arrive at the university.

New, returning, and transfer students are sent on what seems like an endless trail of visiting buildings and offices located on different parts of the campus. They arrive at one destination to only find that they need paperwork from another first. It is a frustrating and disorganized process, and different from what seemed like a hopeful and promising future online. 

Wesleyan’s registration process does not seem to match up to other institutions. You spend hours trekking across campus getting signatures for classes that you have already registered for online, filling out forms, and being redirected to different offices for paperwork.

For example, I transferred from the Dallas County Community College District and had a pleasant experience with the overall academic process there from start to finish. DCCCD has eight colleges to choose from, six of which have athletic programs. I chose the one that best fit my academic and athletic needs for future transfer.

The online process to the DCCCD administration system was well organized and easily accessible. I was able to get admitted, speak to advisors, register, take test assessments, and pay for school all in one building. The buildings were well-labeled, the process was organized and the employees were helpful.

This is something Wesleyan could learn from and strive to provide for their students.

Several of my fellow students in the athletic department, many of whom also transferred to Wesleyan from other institutions, have had a major issue with lack of information or notification when it comes to credits transfers and tuition increases.

I have had a similar experience; I had to retake several courses that I was originally told would transfer from DCCCD, and therefore spent double the money. This fall alone, the university’s tuition rose about $200 per credit hour with little or no notification from the institution. That’s quite an amount for a university that advertises itself as “affordable top-tier education.” 

If a university wants to produce a successful student body, it will need to provide a positive learning environment. Starting off on the wrong foot at an institution could possibly make or break the experience for that student, leading the student to transfer to another institution or drop out entirely.

Students who enjoy their environment and overall experience tend to perform better and recommend academic programs to others.Wesleyan seems to focus on upgrading buildings, roads, and athletic programs, but crucial areas of the administration process are getting lost in the shuffle, leaving students like me confused and frustrated.