Elaine Barron will be graduating this month with a bachelor’s in English with a literature concentration. Barron plans to get certified to teach Special Needs students.
Photo contributed by Elaine Barron

College provides students the opportunity to gain knowledge, hone and refine acquired skills, and grow as an individual.

It is a place where people can prepare to go out into the professional world, and every student begins and ends their college journey with a goal in mind.

With a mission to help others, Elaine Barron, an English with literature concentration major, will be graduating with a bachelor of arts degree this semester.

Barron wrote in an email that her life after graduation looks hopeful and full of opportunities.

“In the spring of 2019, I want to work and save money as well as volunteer at either Evergreen Life Services or Hope Center for Autism,” she wrote.

She wrote that she would sum up her college experience using a quote from the TV show “The Office.”

“It’s simply beyond words. It’s incalculable,” she wrote.

Barron’s most memorable time comes from when she did not let her nerves stop her from being successful.

“I had to give a presentation with two other students for Advanced Writing,” she wrote. “I was so anxious; my mind went blank and I ran out of the room in tears! But I came back!!! I was teary eyed and breathing quite unsteadily, but I finished my part of the presentation.”

Dr. Jeffery DeLotto, professor of English, has been the most helpful to her college experience.

“My advisor Dr. DeLotto has been the most helpful,” she wrote. “It was such a new experience for me to have such an open dialogue with a professor. I borrowed his books, took his time and in return he gave me the best advice on my writing and school.”

Barron plans on receiving further education in the near future.

“I am hoping to get my certification at Texas Woman’s University in the fall of 2019, so that I can teach Special Needs students,” she wrote.

Barron wrote that Wesleyan is where she “grew up a lot and became independent.”

A funny memory that stands out to her comes from the time she felt threatened by a squirrel.

“The other day I was sitting on the bench under the trees outside the Armstrong building and got chased away from it by a squirrel,” she wrote. “He was very vocal and staring me down. I thought he was going to jump on me.”

Barron wrote that she leaves behind the kind of legacy that everyone else leaves behind.

“We all have different personalities and ideas that we bring with us here,” Barron wrote. “We’re shaped by what we learn here, but that’s not only what happens. I think we also shape the campus for the next students to come because of the ideas we put forth while interacting with other students and professors.”