Texas Wesleyan students gathered at Dan Waggoner Hall to celebrate Cinco De Mayo three days early.

Tristen Blake, a senior exercise science major, has always loved Cinco De Mayo, which is May 5.

“I think it’s awesome because it makes me feel a little more at home,” Blake said.

The Wesleyan celebration at Dan Waggoner included posters, facts about Cinco De Mayo, tacos and a fruit stand inside the building.

Blake said Cinco De Mayo is a big event in San Antonio, where he is from.

“Cinco De Mayo is a unique celebration in San Antonio,” Blake said. “Cinco De Mayo means celebrating a rich heritage and the food is always specular.”

Cinco De Mayo is the celebration of the Mexican Army’s victory over the French Empire at the battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862.

Kaylee Baker, a senior athletic training major, has never celebrated Cinco De Mayo until this event.

“Cinco De Mayo wasn’t something my family celebrated,” Baker said. “After celebrating it now, I wish this was something I could have experienced a while ago.”

Baker said she learned a lot about Mexican heritage during this event.

“The culture around Cinco De Mayo is outstanding,” Baker said. “I wish I lived in a city that took (Cinco De Mayo) more seriously because Fort Worth almost ignores it.”

Raquel Velasco, a junior athletic training and religion major, said Cinco De Mayo isn’t celebrated in Mexico like it is in America.

“In Mexico Cinco De Mayo isn’t really a big deal,” Velasco said. “It’s praised more in America for some reason.”

Velasco was born in Chihuahua, Mexico and lived there for most of her life.

“Back home they just tell you the story about the battle and that’s it,” Velasco said. “But we never do celebrate it.”

Students gather around the fruit stand inside Dan Waggoner Hall.
Photo by Hannah Onder

Students celebrating Cinco De Mayo wait to make their tacos.
Photo by Hannah Onder